Manage Expectations Cybersecurity – Liar, Liar

The revolution is here. Every successful, major revolution in history had two primary sides to it, those who benefited and the previously empowered. The Internet was not created for the masses, or by a consortium of the general public with your best interests considered. The previously empowered general public is in many ways now victims of computer systems, particularly relative to the internet.Its use has always favored the most highly resourced and skilled. And, applicable software and hardware development are always expanding, even faster than we can learn and benefit from the prior iterations. It is like opening endlessly nested dolls. Moreover, companies are constantly attempting to outperform each others’ products regarding functional characteristics (size, speed, capacity, mobility, brilliance, ease of application, interface, connectivity, security, etc.), and beat their competitors to sales. The beneficiaries are usually the best-marketed products, the losers are those of us living with and occasionally burned by, unmet functional promises.


Subpar performance of computer system components occurs regularly for many reasons. Plus, data leaks, hacked data, and other information losses occur purposefully, erroneously and are spilled into the public arena by public agencies, private businesses, and hackers daily as unfortunate elements of the revolution in our information access and use.However, the true risk has never been made clear to the public. Most of the general public simply does not understand what they can and cannot expect from personal and business systems, and have few reasonable options regarding the performance of a related business. Who would have expected a financial corporation that earns substantially more than a billion dollars in annually, with approximately 9,000 employees in fourteen countries, and traded on the NYSE to not take exquisite care of data entrusted to it? And, what new college graduate who is constantly bombarded by corporate psychological panel applications would believe that a company to which they are applying has top management that gave themselves a four-month window through which to parachute before letting the remainder of the world would know about their corporate data breach problems – imagine the volumes of stock and options these corporate leaders sold to avoid their devaluation. Most people will simply be able to add to their epitaphs – “Here lies ____. S/he always believed that the wolves in sheep’s clothing were actually sheep.”


We all attempt to travel the internet safely. But, regarding cybersecurity, if anyone ever tells you that your ______ (any type of data) is completely safe on their server(s), in their cloud system or with their specific software, smile and contemplate, “I wish their pants would actually catch on fire!”

Fear This My Fellow Athlete

Competition is good, just as fear is good – if you will use it to your advantage rather than letting it use you. Fear can frazzle us to make mistakes, become uncertain, and anxious, but fear used to our advantage can propel us to greatness. It’s a double-edged sword. Since fear is internal, you own it, it’s yours to use as you will, if you ignore it, it might hurt you, if you use it, it can help you, give you the edge, especially in competition. How might I know this?

Well, I supposed any seasoned competitor in the human endeavor or athlete understands exactly what I am saying, but in case you need more examples to help you better understand this concept, by all means keep reading.

Recently, I read an interesting article online and watched a great video sponsored by Expert Sports Performance, the video was titled: “How Talented Athletes Deal with Fear,” by Loren Fogelman, a well-known sports psychologist.

In my view I believe that Fear is a wonderful thing, a huge driver of the human psyche, but Loren Fogelman reminds me of the truth that: “it motivates some and stops others dead in their tracks,” which is absolutely a fact.

Still, I believe that if FEAR stops someone from achieving or causes them to choke under pressure, then I would submit to you that:

1.) They don’t understand what fear is; and,
2.) They are not using FEAR as an adrenal shot for peak performance

Well, I say; too bad for them, if they are competing against me or my team. Fear can be a weakness if you let it, or high-octane when you need it, YOU decide which. “It’s all in your head” I always say. Anyway, that’s the way I see it. A great book to read is: “Feel the Fear and Do It Anyway!” published by in the 80s as a motivational type book.

As a competitive runner, I used to imagine footsteps behind me and ready to pass. Interestingly enough, I was a pretty good athlete so that didn’t happen much, but when it actually did happen it’s a sound you never forget. This imagination during competitive races propelled me to stay on pace or increase my speed opening up a large gap between me and the other runners. Sometimes when I am out training even today, I will listen to my feet hit the trail and pick up the sounds of the echo and amplify them in my brain to simulate those ever-feared footsteps, thus, propelling me to run faster and faster.